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china-yunnan-xishuangbanna-tea-mountains-map-we-rate-tea-com
Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China

Source Web: Pu-erh. Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China: Background map: Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Ecosystem Services in Southwest China[online]. p. 10. Available on WWW: <http://english.xtbg.cas.cn/ic/ip/200809/W020090811336434467423.pdf>. [q975] [s123]


china-yunnan-xishuangbanna-tea-mountains-map-we-rate-tea-com-1
Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China

Source Web: Pu-erh. Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China: Background map: Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Ecosystem Services in Southwest China[online]. p. 10. Available on WWW: <http://english.xtbg.cas.cn/ic/ip/200809/W020090811336434467423.pdf>. [q973] [s123]


north-of-xishuangbanna-tea-mountains-map-we-rate-tea-com
Tea Mountains Map, North of Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China

Source Web: Pu-erh. Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China: Background map: Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Ecosystem Services in Southwest China[online]. p. 10. Available on WWW: <http://english.xtbg.cas.cn/ic/ip/200809/W020090811336434467423.pdf>. [q969] [s123]


xishuangbanna-tea-mountains-map-we-rate-tea-com
Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China

Source Web: Pu-erh. Tea Mountains Map, Xishuangbanna, Yunna, China: Background map: Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Ecosystem Services in Southwest China[online]. p. 10. Available on WWW: <http://english.xtbg.cas.cn/ic/ip/200809/W020090811336434467423.pdf>. [q967] [s123]


men-laden-with-tea-sichuan-sheng-china-1908-ernest-h-wilson-restored
Men laden with 'Brick Tea' for Thibet. One man's load weighs 317 lbs. Avoird. The other's 298 lbs. Avoird.!! Men carry this tea as far as Tachien lu accomplishing about 6 miles per day over vile roads, 5000 ft. ." I suspect that Wilson made a mistake; either miscalculating a conversion from Chinese Imperial to European weight measure, or that he believed an inflated figure offered him by a less than honest native. However, others purportedly shared the same beliefs that some porters did in fact, carry upwards of 300 pound loads.

Source Web: Ernest H. Wilson. Men Laden With Tea[online]. Sichuan Sheng, China : Wikipedia.org, 1908. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Wansan>. [q959] [s118]


longan-tree-at-pine-island-nursery
The fruit is sweet, juicy and succulent in superior agricultural varieties and, apart from being eaten fresh, is also often used in East Asian soups, snacks, desserts, and sweet-and-sour foods, either fresh or dried, sometimes canned with syrup in supermarkets. The taste is different from lychees; while longan have a drier sweetness, lychees are often messily juicy with a more tropical, sour sweetness.

Source Web: Longan[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longan>. [q915] [s97]


longan-fruits
The longan (龍眼 lóng yǎn, lit. dragon eye), is so named because it resembles an eyeball when its fruit is shelled (the black seed shows through the translucent flesh like a pupil/iris). The seed is small, round and hard, and of an enamel-like, lacquered black.

Source Web: Longan[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longan>. [q913] [s97]


dimocarpus-longan-fruits
Dimocarpus longan, commonly known as the longan is a tropical tree that produces edible fruit. It is one of the better known tropical members of the soapberry family to which the lychee also belongs. It is native to the Indomalaya ecozone defined by South Asia and Southeast Asia.

Source Web: Longan[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longan>. [q911] [s97]


ziziphusjujubavarspinosa
The jujube's sweet smell is believed to make teenagers fall in love, and as a result, in the Himalaya and Karakoram regions, boys take a stem of sweet-smelling jujube flowers with them or put it on their hats to attract girls.

Source Web: Jujube Fragrance in Pu-erh[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube>. [q909] [s96]


zizyphus-jujuba-blanco1-59-original
The fruits and seeds are used in Chinese and Korean traditional medicine, where they are believed to alleviate stress, and traditionally for antifungal, antibacterial, antiulcer, anti-inflammatory, sedative, antispastic, antifertility/contraception, hypotensive and antinephritic, cardiotonic, antioxidant, immunostimulant, and wound healing properties

Source Web: Jujube Fragrance in Pu-erh[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube>. [q907] [s96]


ziziphus-zizyphus-mhnt-bot-2012-10-26
In China, a wine made from jujubes, called hong zao jiu (红枣酒) is also produced. Jujubes are sometimes preserved by storing in a jar filled with baijiu (Chinese liquor), which allows them to be kept fresh for a long time, especially through the winter. Such jujubes are called jiu zao (酒枣; literally "spirited jujube"). These fruits, often stoned, are also a significant ingredient in a wide variety of Chinese delicacies.

Source Web: Jujube Fragrance in Pu-erh[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube>. [q905] [s96]


1280px-ziziphus-jujuba-ms-2461
The freshly harvested as well as the candied dried fruits are often eaten as a snack, or with coffee. They are available in either red or black (called hóng zǎo or hēi zǎo, respectively, in Chinese), the latter being smoked to enhance their flavor. In China and Korea, a sweetened tea syrup containing jujube fruits is available in glass jars, and canned jujube tea or jujube tea in the form of teabags is also available. Although not widely available, jujube juice and jujube vinegar (called 枣醋 or 红枣醋 in Chinese) are also produced; they are used for making pickles (কুলের আচার) in West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Source Web: Jujube Fragrance in Pu-erh[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube>. [q903] [s96]


1280px-azufaifas-fcm
Ziziphus jujuba, commonly called jujube (sometimes jujuba), red date, Chinese date, Korean date, or Indian date is a species of Ziziphus in the buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae), used primarily as a shade tree that also bears fruit.

Source Web: Jujube Fragrance in Pu-erh[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube>. [q901] [s96]


maocha-puerh-shapes
Pu'er traditionally begins as a raw product known as rough Mao Cha (毛茶) and can be sold in this form or pressed into a number of shapes and sold as "raw" Sheng Cha (生茶). Both of these forms then undergo the complex process of gradual fermentation and maturation with time.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q884] [s63]


menghai-2006-7742-protection-ticket
Factories are generally responsible for the production of pu'er teas. While some individuals oversee small-scale production of high-quality tea, such as the Xizihao and Yanqinghao brands, the majority of tea on the market is compressed by factories or tea groups. Until recently factories were all state-owned and under the supervision of the China National Native Produce & Animal Byproducts Import & Export company (CNNP), Yunnan Branch. Kunming Tea Factory, Menghai Tea Factory, Pu'er Tea Factory and Xiaguan Tea Factory are the most notable of these state-owned factories.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q862] [s63]


pu-erh-factory-press
A press. In the past hand lever presses were used, but were largely superseded by hydraulic presses. The press forces the tea into a metal form that is occasionally decorated with a motif in sunken-relief. Due to its efficiency, this method is used to make almost all forms of pressed pu'er. Tea can be pressed either with or without it being bagged, with the latter done by using a metal mould. Tightly compressed bǐng, formed directly into a mold without bags using this method are known as tié bǐng (鐵餅, literally "iron cake/puck") due to its density and hardness.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q860] [s63]


cake-dissection
Nèi fēi (内飞 or 內飛): A small ticket originally stuck on the tea cake but now usually embedded into the cake during pressing. It is usually used as proof, or a possible sign, to the authenticity of the tea. Some higher end pu'er cakes have more than one nèi fēi embedded in the cake. The ticket usually indicates the tea factory and brand

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q846] [s63]


tong-of-pu-er-tea-2006-7742-recipe-by-menghai-tea-factory
The most classical Puerh Tea is the Bingcha, recorded in Yong-Zheng 13th year in Qing Dynasty (1735). Each tea cake weighs 7 Liang (357 grams). Seven cakes make 1 Tong (wrapped in leaves), weighing 49 Liang. It was sold in nice places and also was exported abroad. It was re-named as "Yunnan Qizi bingcha - Yunnan seven cake tea" during the Cutural revolution.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q845] [s63]


golden-melon
Pu-erh shape - Melon, or gold melon - Its shape is similar to tuóchá, but larger in size, with a much thicker body decorated with pumpkin-like stripes. This shape was created for the famous "Tribute tea" (貢茶) made expressly for the Qing Dynasty emperors from the best tea leaves of Yiwu Mountain. Larger specimens of this shape are sometimes called "human-head tea" (人頭茶), due in part to its size and shape, and because in the past it was often presented in court in a similar manner to severed heads of enemies or criminals.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q844] [s63]


2006-longyu-brand-bulangshan-jin-cha-raw-250g-3
Pu-erh shape - Mushroom - Literally meaning "tight tea," the tea is shaped much like túocha, but with a stem rather than a convex hollow. This makes them quite similar in form to a mushroom. Pu'er tea of this shape is generally produced for Tibetan consumption, and is usually 250g or 300g.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q843] [s63]


fang-cha
Pu-erh shape - Square - A flat square of tea, usually in 100g or 200g sizes, they often contain words pressed into the square.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q842] [s63]


zhuan-cha
Pu-erh shape - Brick - A thick rectangular block of tea, usually in 100g, 250g, 500g and 1000g sizes; Zhuancha bricks are the traditional shape used for ease of transport along the ancient tea route by horse caravans.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q841] [s63]


xiaguan-1992-tuo-cha
Pu-erh shape - Tuocha, Bowl, or Nest - A convex knob-shaped tea, its size ranges from 3g to 3 kg or more, with 100g, 250g and 500g being the most common. The name for tuocha is believed to have originated from the round, top-like shape of the pressed tea or from the old tea shipping and trading route of the Tuo River.[16] In ancient times, tuocha cakes may have had holes punched through the center so they could be tied together on a rope for easy transport.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q840] [s63]


haiwan-bingcha
Pu-erh shape - Bing, Beeng, Cake, or Disc - A round, flat, disc or puck-shaped tea, the size ranges from as small as 100g to as large as 5 kg or more, with 357g, 400g, and 500g being the most common. Depending on the pressing method, the edge of the disk can be rounded or perpendicular. It is also commonly known as Qīzí bǐngchá (七子餅茶, literally "seven units cake tea") because seven of the bing are packaged together at a time for sale or transport.

Source Web: Pu-erh tea shapes[online]. Wikipedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea>. [q839] [s63]


2-jaku-1
zhang wei; 樟味 - Camphor flavour. This is sometimes present in old tea tree Puer. Due, it is said, to the presence of Camphor Laurels in tea gardens where they were planted as a form of natural pest control. This is how the tree looks like.

Source Web: Where does Camphor flavor in Puerh tea come from?: Camphor laurel[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camphor_Laurel>. [q834] [s89]


cinnamomum-camphora-turramurra-railway
In Australia -Cinnamomum camphora was introduced to Australia in 1822 as an ornamental tree for use in gardens and public parks, where it is commonly called Camphor laurel. It has become a weed throughout Queensland and central to northern New South Wales where it is suited to the wet, subtropical climate. However, the tree provides hollows quickly in younger trees, whereas natives can take hundreds of years to develop hollows. It has been declared a noxious weed in many parts of Queensland and New South Wales.

Source Web: Where does Camphor flavor in Puerh tea come from?: Camphor laurel[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camphor_Laurel>. [q833] [s89]


camphor-grove-sha-tau-kok
Camphor laurel contains volatile chemical compounds in all plant parts, and the wood and leaves are steam distilled for the essential oils. Camphor laurel has six different chemical variants called chemotypes, which are camphor, linalool, 1,8-cineole, nerolidol, safrole, or borneol. In China field workers avoid mixing chemotypes when harvesting by their odour. The cineole fraction of camphor laurel is used in China to manufacture fake "Eucalyptus oil".The chemical variants (or chemotypes) seem dependent upon the country of origin of the tree. The tree is native to China, Japan, and Taiwan. It has been introduced to the other countries where it has been found, and the chemical variants are identifiable by country. e.g., Cinnamomum camphora grown in Taiwan and Japan is normally very high in Linalool, often between 80 and 85%. In India and Sri Lanka the high camphor variety/chemotype remains dominant. Cinnamomum camphora grown in Madagascar, on the other hand, is high in 1,8 Cineole (averaging between 40 and 50%

Source Web: Where does Camphor flavor in Puerh tea come from?: Camphor laurel[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camphor_Laurel>. [q832] [s89]


cinnamomum-camphora-botanic-gardens
zhang wei; 樟味 - Camphor flavour. This is sometimes present in old tea tree Puer. Due, it is said, to the presence of Camphor Laurels in tea gardens where they were planted as a form of natural pest control. This is how the tree looks like.

Source Web: Where does Camphor flavor in Puerh tea come from?: Camphor laurel[online]. WikiPedia. Available on WWW: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camphor_Laurel>. [q830] [s89]



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„When there is something to strive for, don’t give rise to ideas of gain and loss. Whether there is something to do or nothing to do, let the mind always be at rest. Seek as others do, but do not be covetous as others are, earn as others do, but do not hoard as others do. By not being covetous, you will be free of anxiety; by not hoarding, you will be immune to loss. Let your outward traces be like others, while your mind is always different from the vulgar. This is the model of real practice; it is essential to work on it diligently. “

Source Book: Cleary, Thomas. Practical Taoism. Shambhala Publications Inc, 1998. p. 112. ISBN: 978-1570622007. [q707] [s79]

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